Tree Stonecrop


Succulentopedia

Sedum dendroideum (Tree Stonecrop)

Sedum dendroideum (Tree Stonecrop) is a small, succulent shrub up to 3 feet (90 cm) tall and up to 4 feet (1.2 m) wide. It is often…


Caring for Sedums

@succy_place

By now we’ve probably convinced you that you need some beautiful stonecrop succulents in your garden, so now you need to learn how to care for them! Well, we’ve got your back! You’ll have no problem caring for sedums even if you have a black thumb as long as you follow these tips.

Soil Requirements

The easiest way to kill a sedum is to let it sit in water! Planting sedums in porous soil that drains quickly helps prevent water from pooling and damaging their roots.

If you’re planting your stonecrops in pots, make sure that you use ones with drainage holes and fill them with a porous succulent soil.

If you’re planting stonecrop succulents out in your garden, you should test the soil to make sure it drains quickly enough before you put the succulents in the ground. To do this, dig a hole that’s a foot deep and fill it with water. If the water drains in thirty minutes or less, your soil is ready for your stonecrops! If not, you’ll need to mix three inches of something gritty, like perlite or sand, into the soil to make it more porous.

Water Requirements

@succy_place

Overwatering is another major cause of death for stonecrop succulents! Stonecrop succulents that are kept outside don’t need a whole lot of water. During the winter when they’re dormant, they may not need any water at all if your area gets rainfall. During the spring, summer, and fall, you’ll only need to water them once a week if they’re a tall variety. Creeping sedums can get by on even less water.

If you’re growing sedum indoors, your plants will need more water than ones kept outside. We recommend that you water your sedums about once a week during the spring through fall. During the winter, cut back on watering your plants. Once every three to four weeks should be sufficient—you only want to water them enough to keep their leaves from drying out and puckering.

Before you water your sedums, make sure the soil is completely dry. You can test this by sticking your finger about an inch deep into the soil. If it’s wet, put down the watering can! If it feels dry, your succulent is thirsty and needs a drink, so proceed with watering!

You should follow the soak and dry method when watering your sedums. To do this, grab your watering can and pour water onto the soil until it starts running out of the drainage holes of the pot. If your sedums are outdoors, pour enough water on the soil until it feels wet about an inch down. Don’t water your plants again until the soil feels completely dry to avoid overwatering them!

Light and Temperature Requirements

@succulent_crazy_sisters

Outdoors, sedums can thrive no matter where you put them in the garden. You can plant them in partial shade or full sun and they’ll do well. Here’s some great outdoor pots if you don’t plan to have them in the regular ground or soil. Our team member has one of these bad boys actually!


Watch the video: How to Propagate Succulents Fast n Easy


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