Care For Kiss-Me-Over-The-Garden-Gate: Growing Kiss-Me-Over-The-Garden-Gate Flower


By: Liz Baessler

If you’re looking for a big, bright, easy-to-care-for flowering plant that’s a little off the beaten path, kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate is an excellent choice. Keep reading for growing kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate info.

What is Kiss-Me-Over-the-Garden-Gate Plant?

Kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate (Polygonum orientale or Persicaria orientale) used to be very popular in the U.S. Originally from China, it was a particular favorite of Thomas Jefferson. As time went on and the popularity of compact, easily transplanted flowers grew, the kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate flower fell out of favor. It’s making a comeback now, though, as more gardeners are learning about its benefits.

Kiss-Me-Over-the-Garden-Gate Info

Kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate is a very fast-growing annual that self-seeds in the fall. Once you’ve planted it, you’re likely to have the flower in that spot for years to come. While the plant can grow up to seven feet (2 m.) tall and four feet (1.2 m.) wide, it rarely, if ever, needs to be staked.

The kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate flower blooms in three inch (7.6 cm.) long spiky clusters that hang pendulously in shades of red to white to magenta.

Care for Kiss-Me-Over-the-Garden-Gate

Care for kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate is very simple. It grows fast and transplants poorly, so you won’t find seedlings in the store. Seeds need to be chilled before they germinate, so store them in the fridge for a few weeks beforehand in the spring, or sow them directly in the ground if you acquire them in the fall.

Sow them by pressing the seeds lightly into the soil in a place that receives full sun. Once the seedlings have sprouted, thin them to one every 18 inches (46 cm.). In 100 days, you should have blooms that continue to the fall frost.

Growing kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate plants have very few pest problems. The only real danger comes from Japanese beetles, which may be drawn to the leaves. If you notice that some of your leaves are skeletonized, place traps and lures around the outside of your property to guide them away from your plants.

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Agirlsgirl

Hi! Definitely ws them,that is your best bet! :)
I sowed mine sometime in March/April last year and had great results. If you want a more exact date,let me know and I will look it up! :)

Gardenmom2

See, that is exactly it. I understand the concept of WS and want to as it will be so much easier, but I am unsure of dates to do things. And then when you add in the things that need cold treatment of some sort, I get lost. Yes, if you could help me or point me in the direction of dates that would help me so much. I guess I am terrified of the doing it too early and the seeds rotting or too late and missing out, or not blooming or something. HELP> thanks so much for your help and response. :)


Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate

Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate is easy to grow, and its tall, dense branches of arching stems dangle with deep, neon rose pink, beads-on-a-string flowers that dance in the slightest breeze from mid-summer to frost. You'll adore it, as will the bees, butterflies and birds. It makes a wonderful fresh and dried cut flower, too.

One packet of about 125 seeds

Polygonum orientale. An old fashioned, cottage garden classic that's big, bold and beautiful, Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate, also know as Prince's Feather, is an incredible border filler. A moderate self-seeder, you'll likely find seedlings here and there the second year. The resulting serendipitous combos will surely be wonderful. Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate requires a cold period to germinate reliably. Direct-sow in late fall or late winter for spring seedlings, or refrigerate them for 3-4 weeks in spring before either starting indoors or direct-sowing after the last frost date. Annual. Summer flowering. Height: 4' to 7'.

Average seed life: 3 years.

  • Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate Sowing Instructions
    Planting Depth
    :1/16”
    Seed Spacing:1”-2”
    Plant Spacing:18”
    Days to Germination:14-18 days
    Germination Temperature:65°-70°F

Polygonum orientale. Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate requires a cold period to germinate reliably. Direct-sow in late fall or late winter for spring seedlings, or wrap the seeds in a moist paper towel, place them in a plastic baggie, and refrigerate them for 3-4 weeks in spring before either starting indoors or direct-sowing after the last frost date. If starting indoors, sow cold-treated seeds 1⁄8" deep in good seed-starting medium 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date. Provide even moisture, strong light and good ventilation. Once established, thin to the strongest seedlings. Transplant carefully to minimize root disturbance. Once 3" tall, thin or transplant seedlings 2' to 3' apart in the garden. A moderate self-seeder, you'll likely find seedlings here and there the second year. Summer flowering. Height: 4' to 7'.

Polygonum orientale. An old fashioned, cottage garden classic that's big, bold and beautiful, Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate, also know as Prince's Feather, is an incredible border filler. A moderate self-seeder, you'll likely find seedlings here and there the second year. The resulting serendipitous combos will surely be wonderful. Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate requires a cold period to germinate reliably. Direct-sow in late fall or late winter for spring seedlings, or refrigerate them for 3-4 weeks in spring before either starting indoors or direct-sowing after the last frost date. Annual. Summer flowering. Height: 4' to 7'.

Average seed life: 3 years.

  • Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate Sowing Instructions
    Planting Depth
    :1/16”
    Seed Spacing:1”-2”
    Plant Spacing:18”
    Days to Germination:14-18 days
    Germination Temperature:65°-70°F

Polygonum orientale. Kiss Me Over the Garden Gate requires a cold period to germinate reliably. Direct-sow in late fall or late winter for spring seedlings, or wrap the seeds in a moist paper towel, place them in a plastic baggie, and refrigerate them for 3-4 weeks in spring before either starting indoors or direct-sowing after the last frost date. If starting indoors, sow cold-treated seeds 1⁄8" deep in good seed-starting medium 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date. Provide even moisture, strong light and good ventilation. Once established, thin to the strongest seedlings. Transplant carefully to minimize root disturbance. Once 3" tall, thin or transplant seedlings 2' to 3' apart in the garden. A moderate self-seeder, you'll likely find seedlings here and there the second year. Summer flowering. Height: 4' to 7'.


Kiss-Me-Over-the-Garden-Gate Growing

You may not find kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate at your neighborhood garden center, but entities that specialize in heirloom plants may have seeds. Although seeds aren’t difficult to grow, germination requires a four-week chilling period.

Kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate thrives in poor soil and tolerates either full sun or partial shade. Once the plant is established, it grows happily with very little care. Water once a week during dry weather, but skip the fertilizer it isn’t needed. Even though the plant is tall, it is sturdy and stands upright with no staking.

Pull volunteer seedlings in the spring to prevent out-of-control growth. You can always share a few seedlings with plant-loving friends too. It you decide to give this lovely plant a chance, it’s a good idea to check with the University Extension or Department of Natural Resources in your state. Although the plant is rambunctious, it is considered invasive in a few areas.


Persicaria orientalis

Persicaria orientalis is a species of flowering plant in the family Polygonaceae, [1] known as kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate and princess-feather. [2] It was first described, as Polygonum orientale, by Carl Linnaeus in 1753. It was transferred to the genus Persicaria by Édouard Spach in 1841. [3] Its native distribution is unclear. [4] As of May 2019 [update] , Plants of the World Online lists only Uzbekistan, [1] whereas other sources give a much wider distribution in temperate and tropical Asia and Australia. It is widely cultivated and naturalized. [4]

In cultivation in England

  1. ^ abcd"Persicaria orientalis (L.) Spach", Plants of the World Online, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew , retrieved 2019-05-04
  2. ^
  3. Hinds, Harold R. & Freeman, Craig C., "Persicaria orientalis", in Flora of North America Editorial Committee (ed.), Flora of North America (online) , eFloras.org , retrieved 2019-05-04
  4. ^
  5. "Plant Name Details for Persicaria orientalis (L.) Spach", The International Plant Names Index , retrieved 2019-05-04
  6. ^ ab
  7. "Persicaria orientalis (L.) Spach", Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) , retrieved 2019-05-04

This Polygonaceae article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.


How does powdery mildew survive and spread?

Powdery mildew is caused by a group of related fungi in the Erysiphaceae family.

  • Powdery mildew spores are easily carried by the wind to neighboring plants or to plants hundreds of miles away.
  • Once a spore lands on a host plant, it will quickly germinate and start a new infection.
  • Unlike other leaf spot fungi, powdery mildew fungi don’t need moisture on the leaf from rain or dew to infect.
  • Some powdery mildew fungi require high humidity but others can germinate even when the humidity is low.
  • Powdery mildew fungi produce a mat of fungal growth on the surface of the plant.
  • Specialized structures penetrate the plant tissue to take up nutrients.
  • Spores are produced in long chains rising up in a vertical column perpendicular to the leaf surface. These spores break off and are spread by the wind.
  • Powdery mildew fungi thrive with cool, humid nights that stimulate spore production and warm (70 to 80 F), dry days that allow for spore spread.

Powdery mildew fungi survive winter in several ways.

  • Some of the fungi infect buds of woody plants.
  • Powdery mildew fungi can also create a dark, round, hard, resting structure known as a chasmothecia. These resting structures contain and protect spores during harsh weather. Spores are later released when the weather becomes right.
  • Some powdery mildew fungi survive on leaves that remain green throughout the winter. In Minnesota, this may mean that the fungi survives on greenhouse plants.
  • New spores may also be carried into the state by the wind, after surviving the winter on plants in southern states.


Watch the video: Kiss-Me-Over-The-Garden-Gate: A fast growing knotweed


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