Tomato ‘Hazelfield Farm’ History: Growing Hazelfield Farm Tomatoes


By: Mary Ellen Ellis

Hazelfield Farm tomato plants are relatively new to the world of tomato varieties. Discovered by accident on its namesake farm, this tomato plant has become a workhorse, thriving even through hot summers and droughts. They taste good, too, and are a great choice for any tomato lover’s vegetable garden.

What is a Hazelfield Tomato?

A Hazelfield Farm tomato is medium in size, weighing about a half a pound (227 grams). It is red, slightly flattened and round with ribbing on the shoulders. These tomatoes are juicy, sweet (but not too sweet), and delicious. They are perfect for eating fresh and slicing, but they are also good canning tomatoes.

Hazelfield Farm history isn’t long, but the history of its most famous tomato is certainly interesting. The farm in Kentucky introduced this new variety in 2008 after finding it as a volunteer in their fields. It outgrew the tomatoes they were actually cultivating and thrived in a particularly dry and hot summer while other tomato plants suffered. The new variety has become a favorite at the farm and at the markets where they sell produce.

How to Grow Hazelfield Farm Tomatoes

This is a great new variety for people in warmer and drier climates than are generally tolerable for tomatoes. Growing Hazelfield Farm tomatoes is otherwise similar to other varieties. Make sure your soil is fertile, enriched, and well tilled before planting. Find a spot in your garden with full sun and space the plants out about 36 inches, or just less than a meter.

Be sure to water regularly throughout the season. Although these plants will tolerate drier conditions, adequate water is ideal. Keep them watered, if possible, and use mulch for retention and to prevent weed growth. A couple of applications of fertilizer throughout the season will help the vines grow abundantly.

Hazelfield Farm tomatoes are indeterminate plants, so prop them up with tomato cages, stakes, or some other structure that they can grow on. These are mid-season tomatoes that will take about 70 days to mature.

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Which tomatoes grow the best in high temperatures?

Which tomato varieties have the most heat tolerance?

I live in a dry area (a steppe climate, or a Bsk climate with very hot summers), where the daytime highs are usually 89° F. or above in summer (up to about 116° F. at the most temperatures that high are infrequent, but it's not uncommon for it to be over 100° F. for extended periods), and occasionally (such as now), the highs are a little cooler than 89° F. We're starting to get tomatoes on more plants, now. The night-time lows are usually 30+° F. cooler than the daytime highs.

Many new tomato varieties I'm using this year don't seem to set fruit during certain parts of the year, although I had thought the ones I formerly used from local stores were typical of tomatoes (apparently, most of them have some heat tolerance, it seems).

So, I was wondering: Which tomatoes tend to be the most heat-tolerant?

Also, I'm having the same problem with eggplant, although I'm only growing two varieties (I'm growing about 30 varieties of tomatoes). Feel free to comment there, too.

It should be noted that I'm only asking this question to answer it, because I just made a long list of reportedly heat-tolerant tomatoes, and I wanted to share it with the community. Nevertheless, if you have an answer, please feel free to give it. :) Please excuse the fact that I refer to myself as if I were someone else in my answer. I know there are other lists online, but most of them only list a few heat-tolerant varieties (and often the same ones as many of the other sites).


What Is A Hazelfield Farm Tomato – How To Grow Hazelfield Farm Tomatoes - garden

This was a very unusual year. my favorite varieties didn't fair as well as the later planted "new to me" varieties. Still, in order by taste:

Dana's Dusky Rose
Amazon Chocolate
JD's Special C-tex
Sandul Moldovan
Lillian Maciejewski's Poland Pink
Barlow Jap
Black Master
Mrs Benson
Cowlick Brandywine
Tarasenko6
Preacher Joe
Swisher Sweet
Shannon's South African Mystery Black
Brandywine-Glick's
Lancaster County Pink
Gigantesque
Golden Queen
Wessel's Purple Pride (Cherokee Sausage)
Limbaugh's Legacy Potato top
Black Krim
Indian Stripe
Dora
Spudakee
Giant Belgium
Cherokee Green
Russian Rose
Brandywine-Stumps (not to be confused with Stump o' the world)
Pink Sweet
Royal Hillbilly
Earl's Faux
Chianti Rose
Richardson
Gary O'Sena
Rose
Olena Ukrainian
Caspian Pink
Goatbag
Kellogg's Breakfast
Brandywine-Sudduth's
Heaven's Joy
German Johnson- Dana's
Porkchop
Daniels
Cherokee Purple
Black Brandywine x Sun-Gold cross
Burpee Sweet Seedless (hybrid)
Opalka
Summer Cider
Hege German Pink
Hazelfield Farm Red
Golden Cherokee
Persimmon
Lucky cross
Spudatula
Large Pink Bulgarian
Chris Ukrainian
Black Brandywine
KBX
Amy Goldman's Italian American
Dr Wyche's Yellow
Mr Underwood's Pink German Giant

. Unharvested.
Red Brandywine
Boxcar Willie
Tiffen Mennonite
Aunt Ginny's Purple

. Crop Failure's.
German Pink
NAR
Redwolf
German Head
Oregon Spring
Costalut Geneves
Marianna's Peace
Amish Rose
German Queen
Jumbo Jim Orange
Wild Bills Big Red
Bear Creek
Bearclaw

Thanks for the thoughtful update!! The season was one to remember and hopefully won't be repeated next year :) Sure did like Cherokee Green and Indian Stripes this year and NAR for a red. Hope you AGP is a Stand out this year.

Numerous posts which were off-topic have been moved to this thread:

Because of this years extreme conditions, my 2009 tomato rankings are best used for those who are looking for reliability in short season northern areas that occasionally experience cool/cold and cloudy/wet seasons.

The total package of production(8), taste(6), earliness(4) and resistance to catfacing/cracking(2), for a maximum possible 20 points determine this years' ranking. I added catfacing/cracking because some varieties were so affected. Also, taste is relative to the others as cool, cloudy weather muted the flavors.

19 Ramapo 8,6,3,2
19 Bloody Butcher 8,5,4,2
18 Orange-1 7,5,4,2
17 Early Wonder 7,5,3,2
16 Black Giant 7,4,4,1
15 Black Cherry 6,6,2,1
15 Moskvich 5,5,4,1
12 Momotaro 4,5,1,2
11 Berkely TieDye Pink 5,3,3,0
9 Big Zac 4,4,1,0
5 Uncle Charlie's Italian Plum 3. 1,1
4 Old Brooks 2. 0,2
3 Beefsteak Plum 2. 0,1
1 Aunt Ginny's Purple 1. 0,0
1 Brandywine 1. 0,0
0 Winsall PL 0,0,0,0

? = picked on blush, still not ripe.

This year I don't think it would have mattered. All the large beefsteak types grew large and green and catfaced and still won't ripen. Even an earlier beefsteak type like Aunt Ginny's Purple. It's the weather here this year. Even some of the semi-determinate types that are midseason, like Momotaro and Old Brooks, are barely starting to ripen. But, at least I didn't get late blight like most nearby, so I can't really complain (but I do anyway! -)

BTW, Brandywine, Cowlick's Brandywine, Brandywine Sudduth, and the other pink Brandywines with made up first names are ALL the same variety. Some are strains, and some not even that in many cases.

This year I don't think it would have mattered. All the large beefsteak types grew large and green and catfaced and still won't ripen. Even an earlier beefsteak type like Aunt Ginny's Purple. It's the weather here this year. Even some of the semi-determinate types that are midseason, like Momotaro and Old Brooks, are barely starting to ripen. But, at least I didn't get late blight like most nearby, so I can't really complain (but I do anyway! -)

BTW, Brandywine, Cowlick's Brandywine, Brandywine Sudduth, and the other pink Brandywines with made up first names are ALL the same variety. Some are strains, and some not even that in many cases.[/quote]

Barkeater,
Sorry to hear that you had such a bad season. Maybe next year will be better.
I've grown every variety/ strain of Brandywine for quite a few years now. And this year many of their crosses like Dora, Gary O'sena, Rose, Earl's Faux and others. You would have a hard time convincing me that they are all the same. I plant seedlings on the same day for Cowlick's Brandywine, Brandywine-Glick's, Brandywine-Sudduth's, Brandywine-Stumps, Brandywine Pink, Black Brandywine and transplant them to larger pots at the same time, and again into the gardens at the same time and Cowlicks always produces ripe tomatoes about two-three weeks earlier than any other. They continue to out produce all other Brandywines including Red Brandywine which doesn't even come close to being in the same category. And are usually producing weeks after the others quit! If you enter in Yellow Brandywine you can increase their ripening time even longer.
Then if you cut each "strain" at the equater and simply compare, you'll see that they aren't alike at all. I've had many that say Cowlick's also have much smaller seeds than say Glick's or Sudduths, but They never complain once they've grown the tomato to maturity, as it produces nice large, tasty tomatoes, and on most years it's the first to ripen in my gardens (as it was this year) and one of the last if not the very last to still be producing when the first killing frost forces me to pull the plant.
These are just observations as I have no formal training in plant biology or anything else, I just like growing tasty tomatoes and have been growing them for a number of years now. Cowlick Brandywine is still my #1 favorite year after year, although this year it dropped to #9 as the cooler and wetter weather effected my early planted tomatoes more then they did those planted much later. Still, out of 238 tomato plants this year, 77 0r 78 varieties, #9 isnt that bad a position. You can imagine how good the other 8 that beat it were! Good Luck with yours this coming year.

[QUOTE=camochef145515]This was a very unusual year. my favorite varieties didn't fair as well as the later planted "new to me" varieties. Still, in order by taste:

Dana's Dusky Rose
Amazon Chocolate
JD's Special C-tex
Sandul Moldovan
Lillian Maciejewski's Poland Pink
Barlow Jap
Black Master
Mrs Benson
Cowlick Brandywine
Tarasenko6
Preacher Joe
Swisher Sweet
Shannon's South African Mystery Black
Brandywine-Glick's
Lancaster County Pink
Gigantesque
Golden Queen
Wessel's Purple Pride (Cherokee Sausage)
Limbaugh's Legacy Potato top
Black Krim
Indian Stripe
Dora
Spudakee
Giant Belgium
Cherokee Green
Russian Rose
Brandywine-Stumps (not to be confused with Stump o' the world)
Pink Sweet
Royal Hillbilly
Earl's Faux
Chianti Rose
Richardson
Gary O'Sena
Rose
Olena Ukrainian
Caspian Pink
Goatbag
Kellogg's Breakfast
Brandywine-Sudduth's
Heaven's Joy
German Johnson- Dana's
Porkchop
Daniels
Cherokee Purple
Black Brandywine x Sun-Gold cross
Burpee Sweet Seedless (hybrid)
Opalka
Summer Cider
Hege German Pink
Hazelfield Farm Red
Golden Cherokee
Persimmon
Lucky cross
Spudatula
Large Pink Bulgarian
Chris Ukrainian
Black Brandywine
KBX
Amy Goldman's Italian American
Dr Wyche's Yellow
Mr Underwood's Pink German Giant

. Unharvested.
Red Brandywine
Boxcar Willie
Tiffen Mennonite
Aunt Ginny's Purple

. Crop Failure's.
German Pink
NAR
Redwolf
German Head
Oregon Spring
Costalut Geneves
Marianna's Peace
Amish Rose
German Queen
Jumbo Jim Orange
Wild Bills Big Red
Bear Creek
Bearclaw[/QUOTE]

Camo, I can't believe you can keep up with so many different varieties. I have trouble keeping up with a dozen or so but am going to try many more this next year and see what happens. Bill

"if you cut each "strain" at the equater and simply compare, you'll see that they aren't alike at all. I've had many that say Cowlick's also have much smaller seeds than say Glick's or Sudduths"

If they are that much different, then maybe Cowlick's somewhere back crossed with another variety and has now stabilized into the tomato you like so much. It does sound like a good one.

Camo, Can you tell me about Shannon's South African Mystery Black?

[quote=gssgarden146570]Camo, Can you tell me about Shannon's South African Mystery Black?

Greg,
I received seed from Shannon in South Africa. She had posted pictures in her album at idig of a young boy holding this gigantic black tomato that was grown from a "Green Zebra" packet of seeds. I just had to try this tomato and I requested some seed from her and offered her some Cowlick seed in return.
I grew about a half dozen plants of this mystery black, and at first wasn't sure any would make it as they were fairly thin and wispy plants, but they eventually took off and produced fairly large tomatoes that went through some strange color variations before they finally got that dark maroon color that we've come to know.
Most of mine ranged from 10 1/2 oz. to 18 oz. with the average being around 14 1/4-15oz. They had a somewhat thicker skin than I prefer and a larger core than many of my favorites. The seeds were much larger than many tomatoes. They have a very meaty center with an almost winey taste. A very tasty tomato with dense meat yet juicy. A great slicer. good sandwich tomato.
Upon checking my notes, I see I have some listed with thick skin and a few with thin skin, yet they all peel well. Ranked it at #13 out of 77 varieties grown this year, coming in just ahead of Brandywine -Glicks, which was a great tomato but not as plentiful. I liked them and will grow them again in the future.
Camo


Classic Heirloom Tomato Varieties

The taste, the smell, the classic heirloom tomato will not let you down. Seeds that have been preserved throughout generations will leave your mouth watering for more!

Here is a list of our favorite heirloom varieties …many you can find in our Fresh Produce Market throughout the summer months.

1. – Mortgage Lifter is a classic heirloom tomato with a terrific tale. In 1940s Logan, West Virginia, a radiator repairman crossed four of the biggest tomatoes he could find to produce this beauty. He sold seedlings of it, using the proceeds to pay off his $6,000 mortgage in six years. All these years later, it’s still a popular tomato among West Virginia gardeners—and does very well in other parts of the country, too. Plants bear extra-large beefsteak tomatoes with few seeds and mild flavor. Fruits are pink when mature and perfect for slicing onto sandwiches. Mortgage Lifter bears fruit all summer long. Plants definitely need staking or tall caging gardeners report this tomato to grow as tall as 10 feet.

2. – The Cherokee Purple was rediscovered by tomato grower Craig LeHoullier. LeHoullier claimed that it was more than 100 years old, originated with the Cherokee people. The Cherokee Purple tomato has a unique dusty rose color. The flavor of the tomato is extremely sweet with a rich smoky taste. The Cherokee Purple has a refreshing acid, is watery, thick-skinned and earthy with a lingering flavor. The Cherokee Purple plants are very prolific making this plant a good heirloom for gardeners and farmers.

3. – German Johnson: German Johnson (also known as German Johnson Pink) is an heirloom that came with immigrants to Virginia and North Carolina. It is one of the four ‘grandparents’ of the Mortgage Lifter tomato. It is indeterminate with large fruits that are ‘rough’ (not nice and smooth like a Celebrity, but kind of ridged) and way ¾ to 1.5 pounds. They have pink skin with yellow shoulders, mild taste, low acidity, and are a very meaty fruit with few seeds. They have heavy yields. They are good sliced or for canning.

4. – Black Krim: This heirloom tomato originates from the Isle of Krim in the Black Sea, near the Crimean Peninsula of Ukraine. It is believed that soldiers returning home from the Crimean War, in the late 19th century, gathered these seeds and began sharing them. As a result these seeds were later widely distributed throughout Europe. The Black Krim is highly regarded for its excellent, yet bold taste, and medium to large size. This tomato can vary in color ranging from a reddish brown hue towards the bottom of the fruit, then darkening to greenish-dark purple shoulders. Just a pinch of salt is needed to enhance the flavor, since this tomato already has a slight salty taste.

5. – Paul Robeson: These taste bud tantalizers are native to the southern Ukraine, a relatively small area on the Crimean Peninsula and were limited to only a handful of recognizable varieties. Their seeds were later distributed throughout Western Russia after the Crimean War by soldiers, returning home, during the early 19th century. Through the years, new varieties of all shapes and sizes began to appear throughout the Imperial Russian Empire. They were also known to be grown in modern-day Mexico by the Aztecs. Eventually, they spread north. We know that Alexander W. Livingston, a legendary tomato seedsman and tomato breeder from Reynoldsburg, Ohio, described purple tomatoes he had collected as a child during the 19th century. “Black” tomatoes are not really black. They cover a range of dark colors including deep purple, dusky deep brown, smoky dark mahogany with dark green shoulders and bluish-brown. The depth and darker range of coloration seems to be encouraged by a higher acid and mineral content in the soil or higher temperatures. In northern climates the greater the amount of exposure to and the intensity of UV rays, the darker the color of fruit that will be produced. Besides their extremely dark colors, black tomatoes are especially noted for their exceptionally rich, earthy tastes. Among all colors, black tomatoes are blessed with the strongest taste and are typically the most admired among true tomato aficionados.

6. – Pruden’s Purple: Many folks find this tomato variety comparable in every way to the favorite Brandywine. It has even ranked higher at times in my taste trials. Great for hot day and cool night climate. Large potato leaf vine produces lots of 1-lb., slightly flattened, pretty, blemish-free, purple-pink fruits with few tomato seeds and excellent flavor.

7. – Homestead: An old favorite dating from 1954. Developed by the University of Florida especially for hot climates and known for its reliability to set fruit at high temperatures. Produces firm, meaty tomatoes. Large vines help shade fruit to protect from sunburn, and will need to be staked or caged. Plants in our test garden, where the growing conditions are ideal, bear an average of 50 pounds of fruit over a 6 to 7 week period.

8. – Arkansas Traveler: Originating before 1900 in the Ozark Mountains, Arkansas Traveler is prized for very flavorful, medium-sized tomatoes that resist cracking and keep on coming, even in drought and hot weather. Taste is mild, like the pink color of the fruit. Popular in its home state and beyond. Indeterminate vines do best in tall cages.

9. – Tennessee Britches: From a gardener named Buckley in Dresden, Tennessee who passed the seed on to Joe Atnip who named it “Britches” after his oldest daughter when she was a little girl. Ruffled dark pink beefsteak tomatoes, sweet flavor, 1-2 lb fruit with thick skin. Ripens from beautiful cream yellow to red.

10. – Belgium Giant: An heirloom variety from Ohio dating back to the1930’s, although its name and shape suggests roots in the old Belgian ribbed tomatoes. Plants produce large quantities of huge fruit with some as large as five pounds (my personal best is 3.3 pounds). Tomatoes are very sweet, meaty, and turn dark pink when mature. A low-acidity tomato that is excellent for salads, sandwiches, and canning. The pink skin occurs as the result of clear skin over red flesh, while most red tomatoes have a yellow skin over red flesh.

11. – Marion: Developed by the USDA vegetable station in Charleston, South Carolina in 1960, Marion is open-pollinated and well adapted to the South. A Rutgers type, but earlier and more disease-resistant. Indeterminate vines bear smooth, deep-globed, and crack resistant fruit all season. High yielding and vigorous, so be sure to stake or cage. A great slicing tomato.

12. – Purple Dog Creek: This seed is a rare old family heirloom from Dog Creek in Hart County, Kentucky. Their deep purple-pink fruit can grow up to 1 to 1½ lbs. each. Hardy and disease resistant, they stand up to the hot temperatures of South Carolina. According to Amish Land Seeds, there is an interesting story behind the seeds that were given first as a thank you gift to church volunteers.

13. – Hazelfield Farm: Found as a chance seedling at Hazelfield Farm, a modern organic farm in the Lexington Kentucky area, where it was out-performing many named varieties surrounding it at the time! Believed to be a chance cross between Carmello and Marmande. Medium-sized plants produce abundance of good-tasting, 8 ounce, slightly flattened red tomatoes, even under adverse conditions of hot, dry summers.

14. – Earl’s Faux: A fantastic heirloom Tomato! From Earl Cadenhead who found the seed for this potato leaf tomato variety in a packet of Red Brandywine from a seed trade. Following continued grow outs and additional success, he chose to share these seeds with members of Garden Web. The TomatoFest seed trials proved this variety a WINNER! Our organic tomato seeds produce big, vigorous plants that yield abundant crops of 12-16 oz., beautiful rose-pink, smooth skin, beefsteak tomatoes with a rich, complex and wonderful flavor. The flavor so outstanding that this tomato has won awards in tomato tastings. A great sandwich tomato. We couldn’t get enough BLTs this summer!

Here at Wingard’s, we offer a variety of heirloom tomato plants throughout the growing season. Stop buy and pick up a few to add to your summer vegetable garden. Interested in growing heirloom vegetables?

Are you new to Vegetable Gardening? Check out our collection of gardening videos.


Heat-Tolerant Tomato Varieties

Can you recommend some tomato varieties that will continue to produce fruit when temperatures are high?

Faced with long bouts of daytime temperatures higher than 85 degrees Fahrenheit and nights above 72 degrees, tomatoes may fail to set fruit. The plants may look dark green and vigorous — evidence that all other growing conditions are favorable — but have blossoms that dry up and fall off.

If the heat spell lasts no more than a week, the tomato plants will quickly recover. During long stretches of warm nighttime temperatures, however, the plants will stop setting, causing a subsequent gap in tomato production.

In recent years, a flood of new varieties has been bred for greater heat tolerance. Known as “heat-set” tomatoes, or “hot-set” tomatoes, some commonly grown hybrids are ‘BHN 216,’ ‘Florasette,’ ‘Florida 91,’ ‘Heatwave II,’ ‘Solar Fire,’ ‘Summer Set,’ ‘Sunchaser,’ ‘Sun Leaper,’ ‘Sunmaster,’ ‘Sun Pride’ and ‘Talladega.’ According to the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, many heat-set varieties also perform well in cool, rainy weather.

Some heirloom tomato varieties are heat-tolerant as well, and these include ‘Arkansas Traveler,’ ‘Eva Purple Ball,’ ‘Hazelfield Farm,’ ‘Homestead 24,’ ‘Illinois Beauty,’ ‘Neptune,’ ‘Ozark Pink’ and ‘Tropic.’ Additionally, some “cold-set” varieties, such as ‘Stupice,’ are all-weather standouts because they’re able to function in hot weather, too. A handful of cherry tomato varieties, such as ‘Lollipop’ and ‘Yellow Pear,’ also do well in prolonged stints of heat.

Tomato growers in the South often choose heat-tolerant tomato varieties for summer and fall production — a strategy growers farther north may want to emulate now that climate change is causing hotter summers in most regions. When growing tomatoes in hot temperatures, you can boost your success rate by planting deeper (where the soil temperatures are lower), providing afternoon shade, watering in the morning and using thick organic mulch to keep soil cool.

Learn more about heat-tolerant tomato varieties in the Alabama extension publication Blossom Drop in Tomatoes and the Louisiana extension publication Performance of Hot-Set Tomato Varieties in Louisiana. To find sources for some of the heat-set tomato varieties mentioned here, use our Seed and Plant Finder.

Photo by Tomato Growers Supply Company: 'Stupice' tomatoes thrive in cold weather and can also handle heat.


Watch the video: How To Grow Tomatoes From Seed - The Definitive Guide For Beginners Part 2


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